Shamima Begum buried her son in a ‘gated wasteland’ with a brick to mark his grave

Shamima Begum revealed she still kept some of her textbooks from her matriculation certificate in the Syrian detention camp where she lives – and buried her son in a “walled wasteland” with bricks to mark his grave.

The ISIS bride, 23, last week lost a bid to overturn the decision to revoke her British citizenship, but has vowed to appeal the ruling to try to allow her to return to Britain.

She was 15 when she and two other schoolgirls fled east London to join ISIS in February 2015, and Begum married a 23-year-old ISIS fighter ten days after arriving in Syria.

Her British citizenship was revoked on national security grounds by former Home Secretary Sajid Javid shortly after she was found, nine months pregnant, in a Syrian refugee camp in February 2019.

But speaking recently to journalist Lucy Marley of Rouge Camp, via Cosmopolitan magazine, Ms Begum revealed how she buried her youngest child, Jarrah, who died in March 2019, in a ‘walled wasteland’.

Shamima Begum (pictured with her third child before his death in March 2019) revealed she still had some of her matriculation books in the Syrian detention camp where she lives — and buried her son in a 'walled wasteland' with bricks to educate him.  dangerous

Shamima Begum (pictured with her third child before his death in March 2019) revealed she still had some of her matriculation books in the Syrian detention camp where she lives — and buried her son in a 'walled wasteland' with bricks to educate him.  dangerous

Shamima Begum (pictured with her third child before his death in March 2019) revealed she still had some of her matriculation books in the Syrian detention camp where she lives — and buried her son in a ‘walled wasteland’ with bricks to educate him. dangerous

She decided not to do a video interview – but agreed to talk about her son. He died after contracting a lung infection after Begum lost two more children.

Begum showed the reporter the “walled wasteland” where her son was buried, with bricks believed to serve as gravestones for the dead, including the son of an ISIS bride.

More than 20 women and children are reportedly buried in the cemetery – and when authorities at the camp – run by the SDF – were questioned about it, they were said to have acknowledged the “problem”.

They reportedly added that they were trying to find more space for a “new cemetery”.

Begum said she only received an official death certificate for her son in November 2022 — and was unaware of the exact location of her young son’s burial place until the summer of last year.

Elsewhere, when Begum talks about her school days, she reveals that she still has some GCSE textbooks in camp.

Just last year, it emerged that Ms. Begum told a reporter that the deaths of her three children “doesn’t make me feel sad”.

However, in the final episode of the controversial BBC podcast series, The Shamima Begum Story, she described the loss as feeling like “my whole world fell apart”.

The ISIS bride, 23, last week lost a bid to overturn the decision to revoke her British citizenship, but has vowed to appeal the ruling to try to allow her to return to Britain.

The ISIS bride, 23, last week lost a bid to overturn the decision to revoke her British citizenship, but has vowed to appeal the ruling to try to allow her to return to Britain.

The ISIS bride, 23, last week lost a bid to overturn the decision to revoke her British citizenship, but has vowed to appeal the ruling to try to allow her to return to Britain.

She said she wanted to take her own life after her young daughter died — and didn’t take her own life just because she was pregnant with their third child.

Ms. Begum spoke of her experience when ISIS began to lose its stranglehold on Raqqa. Accompanied by her husband and their two children, the expectant mother steps straight into Baghouz, the last stronghold of the jihadist group.

However, they soon ran out of money and supplies, and in their desperation, they were often forced to stay in guesthouses where the women slept in the corridors and the children spread disease.

Mrs. Begum’s son and daughter became increasingly malnourished and both died as infants.

Speaking about her daughter’s death on the podcast, Ms. Begum said: ‘She was my world, and she was the reason I lived through everything, through ISIS and my husband’s abuse.

Just last year, it was revealed that Ms. Begum had told a reporter that her three children had died

Just last year, it was revealed that Ms. Begum had told a reporter that her three children had died

Just last year, it emerged that Ms. Begum told a reporter that the deaths of her three children “doesn’t make me feel sad”. However, in the latest episode of the controversial BBC podcast series, The Shamima Begum Story, she described the loss as feeling like ‘my whole world fell apart’.

You kept me going. I lived for her, and I didn’t live for anyone else but her. So when she died the whole world collapsed around me.

It’s hard to go from being a mom who has to wake up and do all these things for her kids to waking up without anyone who needs you.

The only reason I didn’t kill myself was obviously because I was pregnant with my second son. If I hadn’t been pregnant, I would have lived my life.

Ms Begum lodged an appeal against the Home Office at the Special Immigration Appeals Commission (SIAC), where her lawyers argued that she should be allowed to return to Britain on the grounds that she was a “victim of child sex trafficking”.

However, the Home Office defended the decision by saying the security services “continue to assess” that it poses a risk to the UK.

Last week, she lost a new legal challenge against the revocation of her nationality, with judges deciding that while there was ‘credible suspicion’ that Ms Begum had been trafficked into Syria for ‘sexual exploitation’, this was not enough for her appeal to be successful. Her lawyers vowed to appeal the verdict.

It was backed this week by the government’s terror watch organization, Jonathan Hall KC, who said British women should be able to return to the UK from Syria.

In a speech at King’s College London, Mr Hall said the UK government’s policy of removing citizenship and limiting the assistance it provides to British nationals in Syria, is “at a crossroads”.

He said the threat posed by ISIS had changed and the UK was now ‘in the spotlight’ as other countries begin to repatriate their citizens.

For confidential support, call Samaritans at 116123 or go to samaritans.org.

Shamima Begum: From straight London schoolgirl to stateless jihadist bride

According to reports, Begum crossed the border into Syria with the help of a Canadian spy named Mohammed Al-Rashid

According to reports, Begum crossed the border into Syria with the help of a Canadian spy named Mohammed Al-Rashid

According to reports, Begum crossed the border into Syria with the help of a Canadian spy named Mohammed Al-Rashid

Shamima Begum was a student in London until Scotland Yard raised concerns that she and two fellow students had traveled to Syria in February 2015.

The 23-year-old was only 15 years old when she flew to Istanbul in Turkey from Gatwick airport to join the so-called Islamic State (IS) with her close friends at Bethnal Green Academy – Kadizah Sultana, 16, and Amira Abbasi, 15 .

Despite warnings from her family that Syria was a “dangerous place,” the teen, who was described as an “upright student,” crossed the border only days later with the help of a Canadian spy named Mohammed al-Rashid, according to reports.

On the BBC podcast series, she said she was told to “pack nice clothes so you can dress your husband nicely”.

Only ten days after her arrival in the city of Raqqa, Mrs. Begum, who is of Bangladeshi origin, married a Dutchman named Yago Riedijk, who converted to Islam.

They had three children, all of whom later died from malnutrition or disease. They were a one-year-old girl, a three-month-old boy and a newborn boy.

Photo of Ms. Begum holding a Union Flag pillow in 2020. This was the first time she had been seen without her usual black burqa.

Photo of Ms. Begum holding a Union Flag pillow in 2020. This was the first time she had been seen without her usual black burqa.

Photo of Ms. Begum holding a Union Flag pillow in 2020. This was the first time she had been seen without her usual black burqa.

Ms. Begum left Raqqa with her husband in January 2017, but they eventually divorced, as she claims he was arrested on charges of espionage and torture.

She was finally found nine months pregnant in a refugee camp in al-Hol in February 2019 by a journalist for The Times.

Ms. Begum told the reporter that it “didn’t bother me at all” when she saw the first “severed head”, but that she would “do anything needed just to be able to go home”.

But the runaway schoolgirl said she did not regret traveling to Islamic State-controlled Syria, saying she had a “good time”.

The former Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Dame Cressida Dick, said Ms Begum could expect to be “spoken to” if she returned to the UK.

In the same month, she was stripped of her British citizenship after announcing her wish to return to the UK with her third unborn child.

The move was deemed permissible under international law only if it did not leave her stateless.

Since then, the former ISIS bride has been embroiled in a battle with the British legal system – she lost her last legal appeal over the decision to deny her British citizenship on Wednesday.

Begum described the initial step of revoking her nationality as “unfair to me and my son”.

Sajid Javid said that while he would never leave an individual stateless, his priority was the “safety and security” of the UK.

Cadiz Sultana

Cadiz Sultana

Princess Abbasi

Princess Abbasi

Qudizah Sultana – killed in an air strike – and Amira Abbasi, whose whereabouts are unknown

The then Home Minister was later criticized by the Labor Party after Ibn Begum’s death – Diane Abbott describing the situation as “cruel and inhumane”.

Ms Begum lost her first appeal to return to the UK but successfully challenged the decision in the Court of Appeal.

But the government has filed a new appeal, meaning her return has been put on hold pending a High Court battle.

She was dealt a new blow when the High Court ruled that she could not return to the UK – prompting her to beg the British public for forgiveness.

When she appeared on television in September 2021, she had drastically changed her look – wearing a Nike baseball cap, a gray jacket, a Casio watch, and her nails painted pink.

Begum said there was “no evidence” that she played a major role in preparing terrorist acts and was ready to prove her innocence in court.

She denied her Western appearance on Good Morning Britain – in stark contrast to the traditional Islamic dress she previously adorned – was a publicity stunt.

In a BBC podcast series released last month, she said she understood the public anger towards her, but insisted she was not a “bad person”.

She told the podcast that she accepted being seen as “dangerous and risky,” but blamed her portrayal in the media.

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